Site logo


Fifth Amendment? What Fifth Amendment?

The Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution:
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Oh, well. Those were the days. A July 17th executive order from the White House broadly does away with some of that quaint old dribble with wording that purports to be limited to the war in Iraq, but legal scholars and others on both the so-called conservative right (read here) and so-called liberal left (read here) find that the wording is vague enough to allow for the property to be seized from any United States citizen without due process, without appeal. If someone in the executive branch decides you are up to no good, your goods are taken away. For good. Good bye. You will have no opportunity to respond, no due process. You've been fingered, nailed. You do not have the right to challenge your accusers. That's all so September 10th.